Efficacy of mindfulness meditation for smoking cessation

This systematic review summarizes randomized controlled trials of mindfulness meditation for smoking cessation.

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Smokers increasingly seek alternative interventions to assist in cessation or reduction efforts. Mindfulness meditation, which facilitates detached observation and paying attention to the present moment with openness, curiosity, and acceptance, has recently been studied as a smoking cessation intervention.

MM did not differ significantly from comparator interventions in their effects on tobacco use. Low-quality evidence, variability in study design among the small number of existing studies, and publication bias suggest that additional, high-quality adequately powered RCTs should be conducted.

Full reference: Maglionea, M.A. et al. (2017) Efficacy of mindfulness meditation for smoking cessation: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Addictive Behaviors
69(June) pp. 27–34

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Treating Low Back Pain

Anheyer, D. et al. Annals of Internal Medicine | Published online: 25 April 2017

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Background: Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is frequently used to treat pain-related conditions, but its effects on low back pain are uncertain.

Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of MBSR in patients with low back pain.

Conclusion: Mindfulness-based stress reduction may be associated with short-term effects on pain intensity and physical functioning. Long-term RCTs that compare MBSR versus active treatments are needed in order to best understand the role of MBSR in the management of low back pain.

Read the full abstract here

Mindfulness-based interventions in epilepsy: a systematic review

Wood, K. et al. (2017) BMC Neurology. 17(52)

Background: Mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) are increasingly used to help patients cope with physical and mental long-term conditions (LTCs). Epilepsy is associated with a range of mental and physical comorbidities that have a detrimental effect on quality of life (QOL), but it is not clear whether MBIs can help. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine the effectiveness of MBIs in people with epilepsy.

Conclusion: This systematic review found limited evidence for the effectiveness of MBIs in epilepsy, however preliminary evidence suggests it may lead to some improvement in anxiety, depression and quality of life. Further trials with larger sample sizes, active control groups and longer follow-ups are needed before the evidence for MBIs in epilepsy can be conclusively determined.

Full article available here