Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees

Mindfulness training appears to reduce stress and distress, but little is known about whether its appropriateness as a workplace stress management intervention for a large and distributed public sector workforce.

team-1317270_960_720.jpg

This study evaluated a pilot 5-week Mindfulness at Work Program (MaWP) for acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy in relation to stress and related mental health and productivity problems for public sector employees.

The intervention thus appears to have potential merit as a workplace intervention for public sector employees across a range of outcomes. Obtaining informant observations was feasible and while qualitative analyses indicated positive changes that supported self-reported outcomes, quantitative analyses returned ambiguous results. A seven-item scale adapted from a popular self-report mindfulness scale for use by informants showed promise, but further work is needed to establish validity, reliability, and scalability of this method of assessing observable changes following mindfulness training.

Full reference: Bartlett, L. et al. (2017) Acceptability, Feasibility, and Efficacy of a Workplace Mindfulness Program for Public Sector Employees: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial with Informant Reports. Mindfulness. 8(639)

Use of Mindfulness in Coping With Incivility

Green, C. (2017) Nurse Educator. 42(3) pp. 137

pop-art-2185496_960_720.png

The experience of incivility in nursing education can be difficult for novice and experienced faculty. The workplace may become an environment of hostility and a source of stress, resulting in depression and physical illnesses.

Mindfulness-based meditation teaches us to think before we react and to discover the origin of our frustrations, stress, anxiety, and depression, thereby disempowering the difficult circumstances currently being faced within our immediate environment. The key components of mindfulness include paying attention, focusing on your breathing, and awakening your senses to your external environment and internal responses to the uncivil behavior.

The full comment article is available for download here

Role of Resilience in Mindfulness Training for First Responders

Kaplan, J.B. et al. Mindfulness | Published online: 19 April 2017

stethoscope-294378_960_720.png

First responders are exposed to critical incidents and chronic stressors that contribute to a higher prevalence of negative health outcomes compared to other occupations. Psychological resilience, a learnable process of positive adaptation to stress, has been identified as a protective factor against the negative impact of burnout.

Read the full article here

Mindfulness training can reduce depression and anxiety among nurses

Hunter, L. (2017) BMJ Evidence-based Nursing. 20(2)

patient-1752834_960_720.jpg

Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research:

  • Mindfulness can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety among nurses and may improve patient care.

  • There is a need for future quantitative studies to measure the nurse-perceived benefits of mindfulness identified in qualitative research.

  • Mixed-methods reviews can help develop a more complete and clinically relevant understanding of a given topic.

Read the full commentary here

Read the original research article here