The effect of mindfulness group therapy on a broad range of psychiatric symptoms

Sundquist, J. et al. (2017) European Psychiatry. 43(6) pp. 19-27

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Background: The need for psychotherapy in primary health care is on the increase but individual-based treatment is costly. The main aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to compare the effect of mindfulness-based group therapy (MGT) with treatment as usual (TAU), mainly individual-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), on a broad range of psychiatric symptoms in primary care patients diagnosed with depressive, anxiety and/or stress and adjustment disorders. An additional aim was to compare the effect of MGT with TAU on mindful attention awareness.

 

Conclusions: No significant differences between MGT and TAU, mainly individual-based CBT, were found in treatment effect. Both types of therapies could be used in primary care patients with depressive, anxiety and/or stress and adjustment disorders, where MGT has a potential to save limited resources.

Read the abstract here

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Women Benefit More Than Men in Response to College-based Meditation Training

Rojiani, R. et al. Frontiers in Psychology | Published online: 20th April 2017

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Objectives: While recent literature has shown that mindfulness training has positive effects on treating anxiety and depression, there has been virtually no research investigating whether effects differ across genders—despite the fact that men and women differ in clinically significant ways. The current study investigated whether college-based meditation training had different effects on negative affect for men and women.

 

Conclusion: These findings suggest that women may have more favorable responses than men to school-based mindfulness training, and that the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions may be maximized by gender-specific modifications.

Read the full article here

How mindfulness can be used to enhance compassionate care

A CPD article improved understanding of how mindfulness can be used to enhance compassionate care | By Toni McIntosh for the Nursing Standard

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One issue I experienced in my practice was that after visiting a patient, I would continue to analyse my actions and worry that I had done something wrong. The cumulative effect of this was that I became emotionally exhausted and felt unable to cope.

My manager suggested that I use a mantra, as discussed in the article. This is a phrase that I would repeat to myself after each patient visit, to enable me to feel confident that I did my best and to move on to the next patient with no residual anxiety. This enabled me to focus my attention and energy on each patient, improved my confidence and helped to challenge my self-doubt. I have learned that effective mantras are short, powerful and individual to the person.

Another change I made after reading the article was to try to ‘live in the moment’. I realised I was constantly ruminating about the past and worrying about the future, which meant I was not fully present in each moment. After incorporating mindfulness into my practice, I feel more relaxed and confident, and I have more emotional energy to give to patients.

Read more about Toni’s experience here

The original CPD article abstract is available here

 

Cognitive behavioral and mindfulness-based group sleep improvement intervention for at-risk adolescents

Blake, M. et al. Sleep | Published online: 18 April 2017

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Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether a cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based sleep intervention could improve sleep and anxiety on school nights in a group of at-risk adolescents. We also examined whether benefits to sleep and anxiety would be mediated by improvements in sleep hygiene awareness and pre-sleep hyperarousal.

Conclusion: This study provides evidence that pre-sleep arousal but not sleep hygiene awareness is important for adolescents’ perceived sleep quality, and could be a target for new treatments of adolescent sleep problems.

Read the abstract here

Role of Resilience in Mindfulness Training for First Responders

Kaplan, J.B. et al. Mindfulness | Published online: 19 April 2017

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First responders are exposed to critical incidents and chronic stressors that contribute to a higher prevalence of negative health outcomes compared to other occupations. Psychological resilience, a learnable process of positive adaptation to stress, has been identified as a protective factor against the negative impact of burnout.

Read the full article here

Mindful Parenting Group Training for Mothers and Their Babies

Potharst, E.S. et al. Mindfulness | Published online: 13 April 2017

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Many mothers experience difficulties after the birth of a baby. Mindful parenting may have benefits for mothers and babies, because it can help mothers regulate stress, and be more attentive towards themselves and their babies, which may have positive effects on their responsivity. This study examined the effectiveness of Mindful with your baby, an 8-week mindful parenting group training for mothers with their babies.

Read the full article here

Improvement of mindfulness skills predicts long-term reductions of neuroticism

Spinhoven, P. et al. (2017) Journal of Affective Disorders.  213(4) pp. 112–117

Highlights:

  • Following MBCT, participants manifested significant improvements in mindfulness skills.
  • At 15-month follow-up, participants showed lower levels of neuroticism.
  • At follow-up, participants also showed higher levels of extraversion and conscientiousness.
  • Improvements in mindfulness skills predicted subsequent changes in personality traits.
  • The mindfulness facets of describing and acting with awareness were most predictive.

Read the full abstract here