Web-Based Mindfulness Intervention for Families Living With Mental Health Problems

Stjernswärd, S. et al. (2017) Health & Social Care in the Community. 25(2) pp.700-709.

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The aim of this study was to explore the participants’ experiences of using an 8-week web-based mindfulness programme in terms of user value and usability.

The programme’s usability was satisfactory and largely corroborated by the surveys. The programme was experienced as a valuable tool to cope with stress in both private and professional contexts, making it a viable option to support families living with mental health problems. Time for self-care, a widened perspective, a less judgmental and more accepting attitude, deterring automatic reactions and setting limits helped the participants to deal with their situation and health. The programme’s ease and flexibility of use were major advantages, although the training requires discipline.

Motivators and barriers to use were illuminated, which should be considered in the development of further online services and study designs.

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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for anxiety symptoms in older adults in residential care

Helmes, E. & Ward, B.G. (2017) Aging & Mental Health. 21(3) pp. 272-278.

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Image source: Moyan Brenn – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Objectives: Anxiety in older people is under-diagnosed and poorly treated despite significant impairments that arise from anxiety. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has been shown to be a promising treatment for anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an MBCT program on anxiety symptoms in older people living in residential care.

 

Conclusion: This study represents one of the first studies of the effectiveness of an MBCT program on anxiety symptoms for older people using a randomized controlled trial. The study has implications for future research that include the effectiveness of MBCT for the treatment of anxiety symptoms in older people, the utility of group therapy programs in residential care and the benefits of using specialized instruments for older populations.

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Individualised mindfulness-based stress reduction for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

Pollard, A. et al. (2017) European Journal of Cancer Care. 26(2)

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Image source: mindfulness – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

People with head and neck cancer (HNC) experience elevated symptom toxicity and co-morbidity as a result of treatment, which is associated with poorer psychosocial and quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes.

This Phase I study examined whether an individualised mindfulness-based stress reduction (IMBSR) programme could be successfully used with HNC patients undergoing curative treatment.

After controlling for pre-intervention mindfulness, there was an association between higher post-intervention mindfulness and lower psychological distress and higher total, social and emotional QoL. This study offers important preliminary evidence than an IMBSR intervention can be administered to HNC patients during active cancer treatment. A randomised controlled trial is warranted to confirm these findings.

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Learning and Mindfulness: Improving Perioperative Patient Safety

Graling, P.R. (2017) AORN Journal. 105(3) pp. 317–321

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Image source: stavos – Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In 1980, McLain identified the top five risk management issues in the OR as wrong patient; wrong procedure performed; improper consent; unreconciled sponge, needle, or instrument count; and burns from equipment.

Approximately 20 years later, the Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System described the complexity of health care systems in the United States and the epidemic occurrence of medical errors. Despite widespread awareness of medical errors, there has been little progress in this area to improve patient safety, and sentinel or never events continue to occur in the United States.

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Group mindfulness for adolescent anxiety

Crowley, M.J. et al. Child and Adolescent Mental Health | Published online 4 March 2017

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Background: Group Mindfulness Therapy (GMT) is a program tailored for adolescents that targets anxiety with mindfulness skills including present moment awareness, mindfulness in everyday life (breathing, eating, walking), body scan, loving-kindness, and self-acceptance. Youth with anxiety may benefit from mindfulness exercises precisely because they learn to redirect their mind, and presumably their attention, away from wandering in the direction of worry and negative self-appraisals and toward greater acceptance of internal states. This open trial assessed the feasibility and initial effectiveness of GMT in a school setting.

Conclusions: We demonstrate that GMT is feasible and acceptable to adolescents presenting with anxiety as a primary concern. We provide further support for the use of a mindfulness-based intervention for anxiety reduction. The group format suggests a cost-effective way to deliver services in a school setting.

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